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King Salmon
King Salmon

King Salmon—https://flic.kr/p/7VuEWS—Click on picture for photo credits

One of the world’s most popular fish, the king or chinook salmon is the largest of the salmon family. They live in the Pacific from Monterey to Alaska and in freshwater streams where it goes to spawn. Fisheries have also planted them successfully in the great lakes.

It is the largest of the pacific salmon and is the state fish of Alaska and Oregon. It has a bluish green back and silver sides with small dark spots and averages 20 pounds however it has been known to grow to 125 pounds and 58 inches in length. The color of the king salmons meat ranges from deep salmon to white. About 1 in 20 king salmon caught has white meat instead of red. Marketed as ivory king, the white meat salmon is considered by many to be better tasting than its red meat counter part.

The king salmon can be found under such names as squinnat, tula, tyee, spring salmon and chinook salmon. Both sport and commercial fishermen prize this fish because of its size and high nutritional value, being high in omega-3 fatty acids. King salmon is also one of the salmon that are farmed. The farmed king tend to be a bit smaller and a bit richer in flavor. New Zealand exports the largest number of farmed king salmon with Chili coming in second.

Cooking King Salmon

Chinook salmon

King Salmon–https://flic.kr/p/6m5eWa–Click on picture for photo credits

Its flakey meat is quite oily and has a rich distinctive flavor that remains moist after cooking. The best way to cook king salmon is to bake, broil, poach, steam, deep fry, pan fry or grill.
Click on a link below for easy ways of cooking.
how to bake fish
broil-fish
poach fish 
steam fish
deep fry fish
PAN FRY FISH                                                                                                                                                  GRILL FISH
For information on other fish and how to cook them go to http://tocookafish.com/fish-index.  However if you need information on shellfish check out http://tocookashellfish.com/

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