(Rockfish-Snapper)

ROCKFISHrockfish  (Rockfish Snapper)
A close relative of the ocean perch, the rockfish is a large family of fish from the Pacific Ocean found from California to Alaska. There are over 69 varieties of rockfish in the Pacific Ocean and about as many different colors ranging from black to bright orange. In the Atlantic Ocean there are only 4 varieties. Rockfish average from 3 to 4 pounds and 18 inches in length but have been known to grow to 28 pounds. The Pacific rockfish is a very important fish commercially and can be found in water up to 9800 feet deep. Some of the best eating varieties are the orange rockfish, the yellowtail, the boccacio the rasphead and the red rockfish, which is also called yellow eye. The yellow eye rockfish is sometimes mistakenly sold as red snapper. It is one of the most popular of the rockfish with both sport and commercial fishermen because of its size, taste and ease of filleting. Rockfish are one of the longest living fish in the sea, often lasting over 100 years. Many varieties of rockfish have been over fished, therefore tighter fishing restrictions have been placed on them. The meat from rockfish has a firm, layered texture that is low in fat and fairly mild in flavor. The best way to cook rockfish is to sauté, pan fry, oven fry, deep fry, bake, broil or poach.

SABLEFISHsablefish  (Rockfish Snapper)
Because of its long slender body, somewhat resembling a cod the sablefish is sometimes called Alaska cod or black cod although it is not a member of the cod family. It is a bottom feeding fish found in the Pacific from Alaska to northern California mostly in the Bering Sea. Sablefish are black or dark green in color with a slightly lighter belly and average 8 pounds and 30 inches in length and can grow to 56 pounds and 40 inches. Their meat is creamy white. Because of its buttery, melting flesh it is sometimes called butterfish and is often smoked and sold as smoked sable. Its flavor and texture is often compared to the expensive Chilean sea bass but the sablefish is much more plentiful. The sablefish has a very soft flesh that is mild in flavor and high in fat. The best way to cook sablefish is to bake, broil, steam or poach.

SALMON, ATLANTICatlantic salmon  (Rockfish Snapper)

The Atlantic salmon can be found on the east and west coast and in freshwater lakes and streams. There is also Atlantic salmon in some lakes that do not empty into the ocean. These are known as landlocked salmon and sometimes called ouananiche. The landlocked salmon is the state fish of Maine. Generally taken from saltwater in the Atlantic from Maine to Labrador the Atlantic salmon goes to freshwater streams to spawn just like its pacific cousins. The Atlantic salmon does not need saltwater to survive. Although the Atlantic salmon is native to the Atlantic ocean is has recently been introduced to the Pacific Ocean and on both coasts it is very popular with sport fishing. Due to high demand commercial farming has become a big business. Commercial fishing for Atlantic salmon is almost non-existent. More than 95 percent of it found on the market has been raised in fish farms. Chili is one of the biggest suppliers of farm raised Atlantic salmon to the United States. The Atlantic salmon has a steel blue back and silver sides with many dark, cross shaped spots that have light blue halos. Also known as silver salmon, landlocked salmon, bay salmon, Sebago and Kennebec salmon, the Atlantic salmon averages 10 pounds and 30 inches in length and has been known to reach 79 pounds. It has a firm, layered meat that is rich in flavor and very high in fat and remains moist after cooking. The best ways of cooking Atlantic salmon is to bake, broil, poach or grill.

 

salmon chum Species  (Rockfish Snapper)SALMON, CHUM
The chum salmon is one of the larger members of the salmon family averaging 10 pounds and 3 feet in length and sometimes reaching up to 40 pounds. It has a metallic blue back with sparsely speckled sides and a silver belly. It is abundant north of Oregon in the Pacific Ocean and can be found in freshwater streams where it goes to spawn. The meat of the chum salmon has a light pink color and has less oil than the other types of salmon. The least prized of the salmons they are not as important commercially as other types of salmon. The chum salmon also goes by the names of calico, keta, lekai, hayo and dog salmon and is often marketed as silverbrite salmon. It has a firm layered flesh that is rich in flavor and relatively high in fat content and remains moist after cooking. The best ways to cook chum salmon is to bake, broil or poach.

SALMON, KING
king salmon  (Rockfish Snapper)One of the world’s most popular fish, the king or chinook salmon is the largest of the salmon family and can be found in the Pacific from Monterey to Alaska and in freshwater streams where it goes to spawn. They have also been planted successfully in the great lakes. It is the largest of the pacific salmon and is the state fish of Alaska and Oregon. It has a bluish green back and silver sides with small dark spots and averages 20 pounds but has been known to grow to 125 pounds and 58 inches in length. The color of the king salmons meat ranges from deep salmon to white. About 1 in 20 king salmon caught has white meat instead of red. Marketed as ivory king, the white meat salmon is considered by many to be better tasting than its red meat counter part. The king salmon can be found under such names as squinnat, tula, tyee, spring salmon and chinook salmon. It is prized by both sport and commercial fishermen because of its size and high nutritional value, being high in omega-3 fatty acids. King salmon is also one of the salmon that are farmed. New Zealand is the number one exporter of farmed king salmon with Chili coming in second. Its flakey meat is quite oily and has a rich distinctive flavor that remains moist after cooking. The best way to cook king salmon is to bake, broil, poach, steam, deep fry, pan fry or grill.

SALMON, PINK
pink salmon  (Rockfish Snapper)The pink salmon is the smallest and most abundant of the Pacific salmon averaging only 3 to 6 pounds but it has been known to reach 30 pounds and 38 inches in length. They are found in the north Pacific from Oregon to Alaska and in freshwater streams where they go to spawn. Commercial fishing for pink salmon is very important in the north Pacific but the fish is not farmed very aggressively. During migration the male fish will develop a hump on its back and are then called humpies or humpback salmon. The pink salmon has a bright gray to blue back with small black spots and a silver belly but when it goes to freshwater it turns to a dull gray or green with an off-white belly. The male sides have a reddish tint and the female have a greenish tint. They get their name from the color of their meat. Pink salmon have a firm layered flesh that has a distinctive rich flavor and is high in fat and will remain moist after cooking. The best way to cook pink salmon is to bake, broil poach or steam.

SALMON, SILVER
silver salmon  (Rockfish Snapper)The silver or coho salmon is also known as hooknose or skowitz. The silver salmon is abundant north of Oregon and can be found in freshwater streams where it goes to spawn. It is a very important fish both for sport and commercial fishing although about 85 percent of all the silver salmon sold is farm raised. The silver salmon has a metallic- blue to greenish blue back and a silver belly when it is in the ocean. When they return to freshwater to spawn their jaws become hooked and their color changes to a bright red with a greenish head. The silver salmon averages 6 to 12 pounds and 2 to 3 feet in length but has been known to reach 30 pounds. Its meat ranges from pink to deep salmon in color. It has a firm layered meat that has a distinctive rich flavor and a high fat content and remains moist after cooking. The best ways to cook silver salmon is to broil, bake, sauté, steam, poach or grill.

SALMON, SOCKEYE
sockeye salmon  (Rockfish Snapper)The sockeye salmon is one of the smaller Pacific salmon averaging 3 to 5 pounds and 2 feet in length but has been known to reach 15 pounds. It can be found in the Pacific from San Francisco to Alaska and is most abundant in the waters off the coast of Washington. It is the third most common salmon in the Pacific Ocean. Like the other Pacific salmon, it enters freshwater streams to spawn. There is also a smaller type of sockeye salmon called kokanee that lives in freshwater, landlocked lakes. These fish are rarely found over 14 inches long. When at sea, the sockeye salmon has a blue gray back, fine black spots on its side and a silver belly. When it enters freshwater streams and rivers to spawn their color turns to bright red with a greenish head and the breeding males develop a hump on their back and hooked jaws. Also known as nerka, blueback, redfish or red salmon, the sockeyes meat has a color that ranges from deep salmon to deep red. It has a firm flaky meat that is rich in flavor and quite oily and remains moist after cooking. The best way to cook sockeye salmon is to broil, bake, steam, poach or grill.

SAUGERsauger  (Rockfish Snapper)
The sauger is a member of the freshwater perch family and is closely related to the walleye pike in both taste and appearance. Often mistaken for a walleye, the sauger has spots on its dorsal fin where the walleye does not. It is found in the eastern half of the United States in shallow lakes and large rivers and is most popular in the Mississippi river valley and the great lakes region. Saugers are more abundant in rivers where walleye is found mostly in lakes and reservoirs. It is a migratory fish and prefers warmer water than its cousin the walleye. The sauger is a small fish averaging less than 1 pound and from 12 to 14 inches in length. It has a brownish back, darker than the walleye, with a white belly that has 4 dark vertical bars on its side. In different areas it has many varied names which include gray pike, pike perch, pickerel, pickering, rattlesnake pike, sand pike and jack salmon. The sauger has a flakey flesh that is mild in flavor and low in fat. The best way to cook sauger is to Deep fry, Oven fry, pan fry, bake, broil or sauté.

SEA TROUT

The sea trout is a very popular sport fish found on the Atlantic coast from New York to the Gulf of Mexico. They are not as popular commercially. The fish is normally found under the name speckled or spotted sea trout but it actually is a member of the drum family. Like the drum, the sea trout makes a drumming sound with its air bladder during the mating season. The sea trout averages from 1 to 4 pounds but can grow to as much as 19 pounds. The smaller fish are known to be of better eating quality. It is important to keep fresh fish very cold because its meat deteriorates very quickly. They are closely related to the weakfish and are also known under different names such as, speck, speckles, spotted weakfish, spotted seateague, and salmon trout. The larger fish take on an appearance similar to a salmon. They have a dark grey or green back with silver sides. The sea trout is an oily fish with a mild flavor. The best way to cook sea trout is to bake, broil, deep fry or oven fry.

SHADshad 300x123  (Rockfish Snapper)

An ocean fish from both coastlines, the shad can be found in the Pacific from Mexico to Alaska and in the Atlantic from Mexico to New Found land. The shad, like the salmon, is born in freshwater then migrates to the sea. It  lives at sea and then migrates to freshwater rivers to spawn. This is where they are caught commercially and are known as river herring. The largest member of the herring family it has been known to reach 14 pounds and 3 feet in length although the market size is about 3-5 pounds.  Shad is a silver colored fish with a bluish- green back and a prominent dark spot directly behind the gills followed vertically by as few lighter ones. It has a deeply forked tail and is a very boney fish usually sold whole for baking. The meat of the shad is grayish in color and turns from pink to brown when cooked. The darker meat is richer in flavor. The shad has mild fishy flavor and is high in fat content. The best way to cook shad is to broil, steam or sauté Poach or Bake.

SHARKshark shortfin mako RR NB Species  (Rockfish Snapper) 

The shark is an ocean fish found throughout the world in tropic and sub tropic waters. It is a slow growing fish and produces few young; therefore there are many fishing regulations.  It has meat that has a taste and texture similar to swordfish yet it is virtually boneless. Where the skin of the swordfish is smooth, the skin of the shark feels like sandpaper.  It ranges in color from off white to black and can grow to hundreds of pounds. Some common types of edible shark are the grayfish, soup fin, brown smooth hound, bull leopard, thresher, tiger and mako shark. Of these the mako shark is considered the best eating and is the largest catch commercially. The mako shark can grow to over 1500 pounds but the average market size is about 125 pounds. The life span varies with the type of shark but the average is 20-30 years. The shark has a meat like texture with a rich distinctive, slightly sweet flavor that is fairly low in fat. It is pink to muddy-red in color and turns white when cooked. The best way to cook shark is to sauté, Broil, Bake Poach, Steam or grill.

SMELTsmelt  (Rockfish Snapper)
A small fish distantly related to the salmon family, the smelt has a shape similar to a small salmon and can be found in both fresh and saltwater. They are one of the few fish that sportsmen are allowed to catch by dip netting. The smelt has an olive colored back with silver streaks along its side. The smelt is a very prolific fish and is almost always found in large schools. Abundant in the great lakes region, a fresh smelt has a peculiar smell, resembling a sliced cucumber. Throughout the United States it can be found under names like candlefish, icefish, silversides, winterfish or whitebait. The smelt has a tender flesh that is quite oily with a rich sweet flavor. The best way to cook is to broil, pan fry or deep fry.

SNAPPER, REDred snapper  (Rockfish Snapper)
One of the most colorful fish in the fish case, the red snapper has a bright red skin and can grow up to 50 pounds and 3 ½ feet in length. They can live for as long as 50 years. The white juicy meat of the Florida red snapper is one of the most prized that the ocean has to offer. It should not be confused with the miss-named red snapper rockfish of the Pacific. The so called Pacific red snapper will not have the snow white meat and mild, sweet flavor of the real red snapper. The true snapper is found in the Gulf of Mexico and on the Atlantic coast sometimes as far north as Massachusetts. Also known as lawyer, Pargo, Pensacola and mangrove snapper, they are found in warm waters at depths of up to 200 feet. It is a very important fish both commercially and for sports fishing. It has a slightly chewy meat that has a mild distinctive flavor and a low fat content and remains moist after cooking. The most popular ways of cooking red snapper is to bake, grill, pan fry or broil.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


+ 7 = 13

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>