Marlin

MARLIN

marlinThe marlin is considered by many to be the top of the line when it comes to sport fishing. They are generally a warm water fish therefore they live in tropical and temperate waters all over the world. They spend most of their life far out to sea.

There are 4 types of marlin, the Pacific blue, the Atlantic blue, the black and the striped. The blue Pacific is the largest having once weighed in at 1800 pounds and over 16 feet in length. It is one of the largest fish in the world.  Females can grow larger than males, commonly found at 1200 pounds where the males are more common at 350 pounds.  They are a long fish with a sharp pointed bill that makes up about one third of their total length. The marlins are cobalt-blue on the back and silvery-white on the belly. Tremendous swimmers, they can reach speeds of over 60 miles per hour. Because of their speed, strength and fighting ability they are at the top of the list for sports fishing.

Cooking Marlin

A slab for the in-laws.

Marlin–https://flic.kr/p/7EB5gR–Click on picture for photo credits

Marlin meat is dark in color with a purple tinge. It is a slightly chewy fish that is mild in flavor with a moderate fat content. Marlin is similar in taste and texture to swordfish and tuna. It is a bit stronger tasting than tuna although a bit milder than swordfish.

Because of it’s texture it is a good idea to place it in a marinade for about an hour before cooking. You can make a good marinade with a combination of olive oil, garlic and lemon or lime juice. The best way to cook marlin is to bake, broil, poach or grill. No matter which method you choose make sure that you don’t overcook it. You can eat it raw so it is better to have it a bit undercooked than overcooked which causes it to become tough.
Here are some links for simple instructions on cooking marlin.
How to bake fish
to broil fish.
How to poach fish
to grill fish
For information on other fish and how to cook them go to http://tocookafish.com/fish-index

If you need information on shellfish check out http://tocookashellfish.com

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